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Dreaming Big

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Do you love Facebook memories? I love them. They are a reminder of things I've done over the past years, places I've been and friends I've connected with or met. Over the past couple of days, these two memories popped up.

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Wow! I couldn't believe it had been six years since my mom and I tackled a big dream list item. I'll be honest; the Susan G. Komen 3-Day had never been on my list until a good friend was diagnosed with breast cancer. One will do crazy things when they feel helpless. I swear this walk gets sign-ups on sheer emotion because no sane person would sign up to walk 60 miles in three days. I paid my $70 bucks and committed to raising money. OH MY GOSH...what had I done?

Thinking back to the walk reminded me of a comment I received from fellow blogger Melinda Todd about my recent blog discussing my dream list. She commented on this blog saying, "Easier said than done, especially if you have money to live out your bucket list."

She was right. 100% right. A bucket list is easier talked about. That's why so many people do a lot of talking but never take any action. That is why people have regrets. I love that Melinda brought to my attention something I didn't address. My blog made it sound like my friend passed away and BAM! I was living my list. But that was not the reality at all.

I think back to the 3-Day and I prepped and trained, hours upon hours. The training was not easy. The walk was grueling. We basically walked back to back 4880683424_fd7160ff1a_zmarathons in two days with little sleep. I knew it wasn't easy because participants were getting picked up, left and right by a van that would take them to the next checkpoint or to the campsite. I was amazed at how people didn't walk the entire 60 miles. Why? Because it wasn't easy. It was hard, both mentally and physically. It was HOT! Hello, it was August in the Midwest. So, I want to be clear, living your dreams is not easy, but that is why I think being able to check something off the list is so enjoyable. It is about the journey, the challenges, the people you meet, the experiences along the way and the finishing.

Melinda also brought up another great point about the cost of a dream list. Yes, your dream list can be expensive, especially exotic or foreign travel. Your dream list shouldn't be based on a dollar amount and whether or not you can currently afford the item. If you look at my list, you'll see there is a range of items from free to thousands of dollars in cost. Nothing is too little or big for your dream list. Some of my favorite list items were free or under $100.

Here are a couple examples of free or cheap items on my list I’ve checked off:

  1. I met Coach K (Duke's basketball coach) while volunteering at the Nike basketball camp. FREE!
  2. I volunteered 100 hours in one year. FREE
  3. I learned to can. I used veggies from my garden and my friend gave me the jars. FREE
  4. I planted a garden. The only cost was the starter plants, but in the long run, it saved me money.
  5. I swam a mile at the local YMCA. I think I paid $35 for six lessons.

Here a couple items still on my dream list that are inexpensive:

  1. Host my own radio show
  2. Read 53 books in one year
  3. Cook a new meal every week for a year
  4. Be an extra in a movie
  5. Knit a scarf

It made me sad the other day when one of my coaching clients mentioned he had never learned to set goals and the power of writing them down. I guess it's a good thing he has a good coach (wink, wink) who is teaching him how to DREAM BIG, write down those dreams and then build a plan to pursue and live out those dreams.

Theodore Roosevelt once said, "Do what you can, with what you have, where you."

I think Roosevelt was right. No matter where you are in life, no matter your age, gender, race or income level, you always have the ability to dream, to write those dreams down and pursue them. You might have to work hard, and that's okay. You might not be able to afford some things on your list, right now, but that's okay. Your dream list isn't about the cost of the dream, the list is about you living your life to the fullest and leaving this earth with no regrets. And hopefully, along the way, you will bless others and inspire them to live their list.

What are the low-cost items on your list? Are you pursuing them? If not, why? As a certified life coach, I love helping and empowering people to pursue and live their dreams. If I can help you in any way, send me an email at Stephanie@GivingGal.com or comment below.

Blessings,

Stephanie

About the Author:

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Stephanie Jones and her husband, Mike, live in Northwest, IN and enjoy lake life and travel. Stephanie is a writer, speaker, life coach, daily giver and soon to be an author of The Giving Challenge: 40 Days to a More Generous Lifer (pre-order now!). She challenges people to be bold in their actions, accomplish and live their big dreams, and bless others daily through giving.

You can contact Stephanie by email at stephanie@GivingGal.com

www.GivingGal.com

In an instant, our lives can change on a dime. A horrific car crash, a divorce filing, or a sudden job loss. I usually think of “in an instant” as a bad thing. Like eight years ago today, in an instant, my college friend Leslie, was gone after a brave battle with cancer. She was 32 years old. Even though we hadn’t spoken since graduation, I followed her journey through her blog. Each post brought tears, and sometimes sobs, and prayers for Leslie’s healing and comfort her family.

But in an instant, Leslie’s death changed my entire life. Yes, I have lost friends in the past, but for some reason, her death hit me hard. Like a ton of bricks. Maybe it was because she was my age. We went to same the college. We were both married. Our lives looked similar. Her death came at a time when I was transitioning from being a police officer to starting a career in the corporate world. Months after her death I would become a workaholic, making a lot of money and wondering why the money wasn’t making me happy. I was living the same day, every day. Working long hours both weekdays and weekends. Was this what I was meant to do? To be? To work to make money?

Leslie’s death started me questioning everything in my life. What the heck was I doing? How was I living my days? I started thinking, knowing, that in an instant, it could all end. It could all end and what would I have done?

Years earlier I had created my dream list. Things I wanted to do. People I wanted to meet. Places I wanted to go and things I wanted to learn. It was saved in a file on my desk. I only opened it when I had something to add, rarely, if ever, checking anything off. Leslie’s death challenged me to live my list. To be intentional about each day.

My husband and I had a come to Jesus meeting August 2008. It was a heated discussion in our kitchen, I remember it like it was yesterday. I remember yelling, “what the hell are we doing with our lives?” I wasn’t angry, I was scared. Scared that the day would come and I would have a ton of regrets. The day would come and I wouldn’t be able to do all the things I wanted to do. The things that had been sitting trapped in an excel file on my desk.

Shortly after that discussion, we decided to take our first step to living our lives. We started planning our dream vacation to Hawaii. It had been five years sinceUntitled design (1) we’d been on vacation because we were always “too busy.”

The trip was amazing. I learned to surf. We got up at 2:30a.m. to drive up a mountain to see the sunrise above the clouds and then biked 20 miles down. I thought I was going to die, but I did it. I was living! I took my first helicopter ride and I swam with dolphins. Did I mention a dolphin pooped in my hand? But I didn’t care. I…was… LIVING!

Since Leslie’s death, here are some of the cool things I have experience (click here for full list):

  • Saw Duke win a NCAA National Championship…LIVE
  • Learned to kayak and now do so almost every weekend
  • Ran a marathon with my mom
  • Planted a garden and learned to make and can my own salsa
  • Learned to knit (but I need to finish a scarf)
  • Took ice skating lessons
  • Swam with sharks
  • Sat in the audience at an Oprah Show
  • Walked 60 miles in three days, raising funds for cancer
  • Took my dad to see Washington D.C. during police week

I think of Leslie almost every day. Every July 26th, her name pops up on my calendar. It’s a day for me to be thankful for her journey changing my life, to remember her family and make sure I’m living the life she can’t.

Friends, right now your life can change in an instant. From here on out you can choose to live a different life. If there is something you are struggling with or going through, don’t let it steal your happiness…your joy. What are your priorities? If you don’t know, sit down and make a list. Do you have a bucket list? If so, are you living it? If not, write out your list and keep adding to it. Then pick one and make a plan to live it!

I’ll end with one of my favorite quotes by Eleanor Roosevelt, “The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.”

Blessings,

Stephanie

About the Author:

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Stephanie Jones and her husband, Mike, live in Northwest, IN and enjoy lake life and travel. Stephanie is a writer, speaker, life coach, daily giver and soon to be an author of The Giving Challenge: 40 Days to a More Generous Lifer (pre-order now!). She challenges people to be bold in their actions, accomplish and live their big dreams, and bless others daily through giving.

You can contact Stephanie by email at stephanie@GivingGal.com.

A few things I learned from my father…

1. Spend time with your kids, lots of time. Take them hiking, play in the backyard, read with them and play games. My dad took us to the park at least once a week. My sister and I now have a love for simple, inexpensive adventures and love the outdoors.

2. Attend their sporting events and be their biggest cheerleader. Don’t criticize the coach if your kid isn’t getting playing time and don’t be loud and obnoxious from the stands; it’s embarrassing for your child. In the four years of my high school athletic career, my father never missed a basketball game or track/cross country meet. He expected two things, (1) Hustle and (2) 100% effort.

3. Make your kids work, and work hard. From a young age we were picking up sticks in the yard, doing chores, stacking wood, and I had my first job at 13. Guess what? It didn’t kill my sister and me, and I have never been unemployed. At times I’ve had two or three jobs to pay the bills, but it didn’t matter because my dad taught me hard work is how you become a productive member of society and get the things you want in life in life, even though “things” have never been important to him. He taught us we are not entitled to anything.

4. Show love and affection. My dad has never shied away from hugs, a kiss on the cheek or an I love you. I’m 38, and if I’m at my parent’s house, there’s a good chance in the evenings you’ll find me snuggled up with my dad on the couch watching tv.

5. Find a common interest. My dad and I have always loved to be in nature together, talk investigations and politics, and there was a time we did 5ks and even a biathlon of shooting and running.

6. Get involved in your community and set a good example for your children. My dad was a firefighter and police officer. He’d help anyone in need. Heck, yesterday he stopped for a broken down motorcyclist. The guy was an outlaw with a pistol on his side. Dad offered him water and pointed across the street to his house and said, “If you need anything I’m right over there.” I thought he was crazy, but he just responded, “I’d expect someone to do the same for me.”

7. Vote, respect the flag and honor and be grateful to those who have or are serving in the military. Not voting has never crossed my mind because my dad has taught me the importance of living in a country where it’s people are allowed to vote. From an early age, I was taught to be silent, not move, place my hand over my heart and not take my eyes off the flag during the national anthem. Many men and women fought hard and died so the flag could fly free. If you ever drive by his house, Old Glory is proudly displayed on a huge flagpole in the front yard.

If you haven’t gotten the point, my dad is pretty amazing! My guess is many fathers could learn a thing or two from him. Happy Father’s Day dad!

If you know a new father or one that could use some pointers, please share with them! Their children will thank you!!!

Blessings,

Stephanie

Never miss a post! Sign up for my weekly newsletter here.

About the Author:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Stephanie Jones and her husband, Mike, live in Northwest, IN and enjoy lake life and travel. Stephanie is a writer, speaker, life coach, daily giver and the author of The Giving Challenge: 40 Days to a More Generous Life. She challenges people to live their dreams, discover their gifts, and do amazing things.

You can contact Stephanie by email at stephanie@GivingGal.com.

Step into my world for a moment. I know I appear to have it all put together, but most days I’m stumbling through life and laughing at myself.

Most of my coaching clients are scattered throughout the country, but tonight I was excited to meet a customer in person, someone local. I left early so I could swing by the library and get gas.

Things often don’t go as planned.

Several months earlier, I canceled my $5.99 Netflix subscription to save a couple of dollars, and I figured I could get movies at the library. I checked two movies out but forgot to return them before vacation. I returned them tonight, and the librarian said, “Um, do you know these are quite overdue?” I responded, “Yes, I’ve been on vacation. I know they are around a week overdue.”

Well, my fee was $14.00!!! I about fell over. Here I was trying to save a couple of bucks, and I ended up spending three times more for two movies in one week. All I could do was chuckle and think, well I just gave a donation to the library.

After checking out Living Forward (a book I’ve wanted to read), I exited the library and pulled into the gas station, exited my vehicle and pumped gas. When I heard the click, I hopped out, and as I removed the handle, gas sprayed everywhere. My shoes and jeans covered in gas. Great!!! I texted my client I was going to be late as I could hardly stand the smell of gas permeating off my clothes into the air. I scurried home, changed and sped out to meet my client. I was glad I had shown her grace two weeks earlier when she needed to cancel last minute. My actions reciprocated.

We had a great session, and I’m glad she didn’t bail on me. Even though at times I’m scattered, scrambling and fumbling…I’m a darn good coach and help others based on my experiences.

I remembered a couple of things today.

1. Laugh at yourself

2. Show grace to others, as you may need it shown to you

3. Even when things aren’t going your way, they can always turn around.

Have you laughed at yourself lately? Have you shown grace to someone in a time of need? I hope you are traveling through life knowing that when things aren’t going your way that all you have to do is wait, and your low will turn into a high.

Blessings,
Stephanie

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About the Author:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Stephanie Jones and her husband, Mike, live in Northwest, IN and enjoy lake life and travel. Stephanie is a writer, speaker, life coach, daily giver and the author of The Giving Challenge: 40 Days to a More Generous Life. She challenges people to live their dreams, discover their gifts, and do amazing things.

You can contact Stephanie by email at stephanie@GivingGal.com.

This morning I finished reading Brennan Manning’s book All is Grace. As I think about the past couple of days, the quote below resonated with me. We are constantly judging, trying to change others, want others to follow rules and our lifestyle, but what I know is true is God loves us just as we are. His love isn’t conditional.

He loved each and every person that lost their life in the Orlando shooting.

My friend Kevin Buchanan said it perfectly…”Because they deserve to be known by name. Their stories need to be heard. And more than anything, to know they were loved and their lives mattered.”

Edward Sotomayor Jr., 34 years old
Stanley Almodovar III, 23 years old
Luis Omar Ocasio-Capo, 20 years old
Juan Ramon Guerrero, 22 years old
Eric Ivan Ortiz-Rivera, 36 years old
Peter O. Gonzalez-Cruz, 22 years old
Luis S. Vielma, 22 years old
Kimberly Morris, 37 years old
Eddie Jamoldroy Justice, 30 years old
Darryl Roman Burt II, 29 years old
Deonka Deidra Drayton, 32 years old
Alejandro Barrios Martinez, 21 years old
Anthony Luis Laureanodisla, 25 years old
Jean Carlos Mendez Perez, 35 years old
Franky Jimmy Dejesus Velazquez, 50 years old
Amanda Alvear, 25 years old
Martin Benitez Torres, 33 years old
Luis Daniel Wilson-Leon, 37 years old
Mercedez Marisol Flores, 26 years old
Xavier Emmanuel Serrano Rosado, 35 years old
Gilberto Ramon Silva Menendez, 25 years old
Simon Adrian Carrillo Fernandez, 31 years old
Oscar A Aracena-Montero, 26 years old
Enrique L. Rios, Jr., 25 years old
Miguel Angel Honorato, 30 years old
Javier Jorge-Reyes, 40 years old
Joel Rayon Paniagua, 32 years old
Jason Benjamin Josaphat, 19 years old
Cory James Connell, 21 years old
Juan P. Rivera Velazquez, 37 years old
Luis Daniel Conde, 39 years old
Shane Evan Tomlinson, 33 years old
Juan Chevez-Martinez, 25 years old
Jerald Arthur Wright, 31 years old
Leroy Valentin Fernandez, 25 years old
Tevin Eugene Crosby, 25 years old
Jonathan Antonio Camuy Vega, 24 years old
Jean C. Nives Rodriguez, 27 years old
Rodolfo Ayala-Ayala, 33 years old
Brenda Lee Marquez McCool, 49 years old
Yilmary Rodriguez Solivan, 24 years old
Christopher Andrew Leinonen, 32 years old
Angel L. Candelario-Padro, 28 years old
Frank Hernandez, 27 years old
Paul Terrell Henry, 41 years old
Antonio Davon Brown, 29 years old
Christopher Joseph Sanfeliz, 24 years old
Akyra Monet Murray, 18 years old

Blessings,

Stephanie

About the Author:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Stephanie Jones and her husband, Mike, live in Northwest, IN and enjoy lake life and travel. Stephanie is a writer, speaker, life coach, daily giver and soon to be author of The Giving Challenge: 40 Days to a More Generous Life. She challenges people to be bold in their actions, accomplish and live their big dreams, and bless others daily through giving.

You can contact Stephanie by email at stephanie@GivingGal.com.

Do you know the dreams of your friends? Two years ago I watched my niece construct all sorts of amazing things with Legos. She had music playing and I asked her about the song and artist. She stated it was the Newsboys and how she would love to see them in concert. Memories flooded my mind as I attended several Newsboys concerts some 25 years ago. I love everything concerts offer. Dancing, singing, good energy, fun and memory making with friends. I loved she was showing an interest in live music, as it has been a big part of my life over the years.

After our brief discussion, I could have easily forgotten about the conversation and went on enjoying our time together. But I think we have a duty to help others accomplish their dreams. If we can, we should take action, especially where they may not be able.

Want to support someone's dream? Here are 5 Handy Tips that you will help:

  1. Listen. Sometimes we do a good job of speaking, but often don't listen and hear what others are telling us. People share their dreams with us all the time, but we may let their words go in one ear and out the other.
  2. Make Their Dreams a Priority. Write it down. Put it on your to do list. Keep it in the front of your mind. We all live busy lives and it's hard to remember our own goals and daily tasks in addition to someone else's.
  3. Research. Start researching how you can help your friend accomplish their dream. For the concert, I continually checked Newsboys tour page on their website. I was so excited when a location and date that worked popped up!
  4. Get Your Friend Involved. It's their dream, but for one reason or another, they hadn't been pursuing it. It may be confidence, time, ability, etc. By you doing some of the leg work, it may be enough to jump start them to making progress on accomplishing their dream.
  5. Be an Encourager. Let your friend know you are there to support their journey. From time to time, check in. Ask for next steps and discuss a time frame for accomplishing the steps. Be a cheerleader along the way and before you know it, they'll be accomplishing their dream.

IMG_7742After two years, I was finally able to take my niece (and nephew) to the Newsboys concert. It was an incredible evening. We laughed, sang songs, danced, ate popcorn and enjoyed time together as a family, as I couldn’t leave out my mom and sister. Sure I could have bought Legos, for her birthday, but making a memory that will last a lifetime was so much better. Experience gifts are one of the best gifts you can give. If it helps someone accomplish their dream, even better!

Blessings, Stephanie

About the Author:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Stephanie Jones and her husband, Mike, live in Northwest, IN and enjoy lake life and travel. Stephanie is a life coach, speaker, daily giver and soon to be author who challenges people to be bold in their actions, accomplish big dreams, and bless others through giving.

You can contact Stephanie by email at stephanie@GivingGal.com.

I’m having surgery tomorrow, it’s scary, but I’m not in control. The scheduler calls to review the operation time, procedure and goes through a series of questions based on information from a prior surgery. The scheduler asked, “Do you have GERD?”

I answer, “No.”

She asks if I’m on any medication for GERD. I say, no.

She then questions, “How did you get rid of GERD?”

I said, “I stopped eating gluten?”

We have a long discussion about it, I tell her I fall off the bandwagon at times, but always revert to restricting gluten.

She says, “I could probably solve a lot of my problems if I could get off caffeine.”

“You CAN get off caffeine,” I said.

No, no I can’t.

Sure you can. Why not?

The questioning goes on for a couple of minutes, and after encouraging her a bit, she gets it and says, “I guess if I were positive I’d have better success.”

It’s a start!

All of that to say, our thoughts dictate many of our actions. They dictate if we not only dream but pursue our dreams and then believe enough in ourselves to accomplish those goals.

There is something you want to do right now, but you’re stuck. Stuck in bad habits. Stuck thinking negatively and you think your situation is never going to change.

I’m here to tell you that’s not true. That’s not true at all.

Change negative thoughts to positive and watch how your life changes.

Two years ago I talked to a group of moms about DREAMING BIG. During the workshop one mom stood up and shared, with a crowd of strangers, she’d always wanted to write a book. She was scared to utter those words. She knew nothing about writing. But guess what? A year after standing up and sharing her dream she submitted her book to a publisher!

She shared her dream, hired me as her coach, we worked on a game plan, she took baby steps and made progress every week, focusing on her goal. She invested time and money into herself, and her life is on an amazing new path. We both have no doubt she’ll be a published author, and we are excited where else God is going to take her.

Today is the day you…

  • go after what you want.
  • turn your can’t to can.
  • stop thinking you’re not worth it. You are!

You were created to do AMAZING things.

Write your dream down. Share it with someone. Write the next three steps you need to take that are going to get you closer to accomplishing your goal. Start taking action!

If I can help, let me know. I’d love to go on the journey with you.

Blessings,

Stephanie

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About the Author:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stephanie Jones and her husband, Mike, live in Northwest, IN and enjoy lake life and travel. Stephanie is a writer, speaker, life coach, daily giver and the author of The Giving Challenge: 40 Days to a More Generous Life. She challenges people to live their dreams, discover their gifts, and do amazing things.

You can contact Stephanie by email at stephanie@GivingGal.com.

 

Sitting on the edge of the tub wincing and talking to myself, turning around from shaving my husband says, "Pull it off quickly."

Yank! Ouch! Jetting up and hopping around I'd done it. I pulled off my toenail and now was in excruciating pain. Sitting back down, I said, "I'm feeling woozy. I may pass out."

I was a little dramatic. But my toe did hurt.

It's been two months since I ran the Chicago Marathon and I'm still feeling the effects. I've lost two toenails in two nights. I'm processing the experience and trying to hold on to my greatest accomplishment of the year, my Everest.

What's that quote by Helen Keller?

"Character cannot be developed in ease and quiet. Only through experience of trial and suffering can the soul be strengthened, ambition inspired, and success achieved."

The quote by Ms. Keller sums ups my training and the marathon. It was not easy and definitely not quiet. Ask my husband. I whined, cried and complained. Every training run came with a trial, from being chased by dogs to jumping in ditches because of distracted drivers. The first couple of months I suffered with every step. I was out of shape and nagging back problems wore on me more mentally than physically.

After crossing the finish line, I knew I had been strengthened, inspired, and success achieved.

Like mile 17, I was still running through a wall. I drew my inspiration for mile 18 from Brian Dickerson, Everest Solo Summiteer, Former USN Air Rescue Swimmer and Author of one of my favorite books, Blind Descent.

Brian and I work at Cisco and I had an opportunity to hear him speak at a company event. After the event, I logged into Amazon and bought his book, Blind Descent. I've been obsessed with Everest for years. A love passed down from my father. I've watched all the movies and read many books on the world's highest peak. If there is an IMAX on Everest I'm there!

My review on GoodReads summed up my feeling for Blind Descent and why Brian was my inspiration for mile 18.

" There are several things in life I’m obsessed with in reading about, Navy Seals and Mt. Everest. I think the draw for me is the understanding of those that are not just physically tough, but extraordinarily mental tough and Brian Dickinson definitely falls into this category. I started the book on a Saturday morning and couldn’t put it down. I’m a slow reader, so I literally did not accomplish anything all weekend except finishing the book. He had my attention in the prologue and never lost it. I might add he had me in tears on page two of the prologue also. This book was written with so much emotion I felt like I was on the journey with him and his family and friends. I’m not sure how one doesn’t believe in God after reading this book. I have ready many books on Everest, the tragedies and stories of survival and this by far is the best I’ve read. Even if you are not into Everest it would still be an excellent read. Anyone going through a struggle or a hurdle they think is impossible needs to read this book. There is always hope."

As I struggled with each step I would think about Brian's journey on Everest. I would think, it's sunny and warm while I'm running. Brian faced subzero temperatures. I had plenty of oxygen and Brian ran out. I was surrounded by thousands of people, cheering and supporting me each step of the marathon. Brian was alone. I could see the path in front of me, read the signs fans created and knew if there was a pothole that needed to be avoided. Brian experienced snow blindness and couldn't see his hand in front of his face.

If Brian could make it off Mt. Everest blind, I was going to make it through mile 18 and I did. No excuses. I suffered through mile 18, but character was developed. I was nearing the peak of my Everest. I ripped off the label with Brian's name etched, gave it a kiss, whispered a thank you and flung it over my shoulder. I was onto #19.

As we approach the New Year, I challenge you to think about what you want to accomplish in 2016? What's your Everest? Here are a couple of steps you can take that will put you on the path to success.

  1. Go read Blind Descent. It will motivate you to Dream Big and pursue those dreams.
  2. Grab a pen and paper, find a cozy, quiet place in your home, and jot down your goals for 2016.
  3. Pick one goal to focus on and write the next three steps you have to take to move towards accomplishing your goal.
  4. Shoot me an email at Stephanie@GivingGal.com or post on my FB wall one thing I can do to help you accomplish your goal. Accountability is key to success!

I'll wrap up with my favorite line from Blind Descent,

"Whatever your mountain is-no matter how impossible it seems at times, no matter how many obstacles you face along the way, and no matter how many people tell you it can't be done- it is possible for you to summit. My parting words are simple: Live life. Create goals, and then chase after them."

Blessings,

Stephanie

If you missed my first 17 miles, you can check out my stories here:

Miles #1- #4

Miles #5- #8

Miles #9- #13

Miles #14- #15

Mile #16

Mile #17

 

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I have an exercise for you.

 

  1. Grab a sheet of paper and pen.
  2. Write numbers 1-26 down the left side of the paper.
  3. Jot down people that have inspired you.
  4. Once your list is complete, write notes to everyone on your list. If they are no longer with us, find a family member and send them a note.

#3 may take you 15 minutes or a couple of months. That's okay. I can't tell you how powerful it was for me to make my list. I know the process affected me and those of you that are kind enough to follow me on my mile by mile journey. It helped me get through a difficult time and may help you get through something in your life.

I asked you to go through the exercise so you'd understand that the task is more difficult than first perceived. There are hundreds of people that I love, that challenge and motivate me in various ways and the list wasn't intended to slight anyone. I wish I could share the formula I used to narrow it down to 26, but most of it was based on feeling. Feeling strong enough about someone's situation that it would motivate me mile by mile.

I must be honest…I cheated on mile 17. I didn't choose one person for this mile, but three people, one family. Their story is intertwined and there is no way I could choose only one. I knew that for this mile, I needed to keep them together. I needed to pray for them as a family and draw from the strength they pull from each other.

Mile #17 was dedicated to a high school friend and fellow track/cross country runner Pam. In high school, I strove to be a runner like Pam. She worked hard and each time she stepped onto the track it seemed so effortless. She left nothing to chance and when she crossed the finished line it was evident she had given it her all.

Pam's children Brookelyn and Derek have Dysautonomia, a medical condition that causes a malfunction of the Autonomic Nervous System. Here's a little physiology lesson, the automatic functions of the body are the ones we consciously don't have to think about, such as heart rate, digestion, blood pressure, kidney function and body temperature control.

They have also been diagnosed with mitochondrial disease which is a group of disorders caused by dysfunctional mitochondria, the organelles that are the powerhouse of the cell. Mitochondria are found in every cell of the human body except red blood cells, and convert the energy of food molecules into the ATP that powers most cell functions. Symptoms include poor growth, loss of muscle coordination, muscle weakness, visual problems, hearing problems, learning disabilities, heart disease, liver disease, kidney disease, gastrointestinal disorders, respiratory disorders, neurological problems, autonomic dysfunction and dementia (wikipedia).Can you imagine being a child and having deal with such a diseases?

Pam shares the struggles of this disease honestly and openly with her friends and family on facebook. But I have taken note, as others have, of common themes in Pam's journey.

  1. Thankfulness. She is often thankful for friends, family and coworkers. Never losing sight of what is important or taking these people or things for granted.
  2. Fighters. I love that she shows us pictures of her children in the hospital smiling and snuggling together. She refers to them often as fighters. I love that term. A fighter never gives up. A fighter pushes through tough times. And fighters, as she notes, don't complain.
  3. Faith. Pam often draws on her Christian faith to get her through the day. She shares her faith openly and provides encouragement to all that read her posts.
  4. Heroes. Her heroes are not in capes, tight pants and in a comic book. Her heroes are her children and she is theirs. Heroes are admired for their bravery, courage and noble qualities. Several weeks she posted one of my favorite quotes which I think perfectly aligns to the topic of heroes.

I must admit, mile 17 was a difficult mile for me. I wanted to walk soooo bad. I pulled out all the stops to keep me running. I have always had a passion for music and songs have been with me almost every moment, good or bad, throughout my life. And songs propelled me forward through every step of the Chicago Marathon. I knew what I needed to keep me going. I flipped through my iPod to find Jason Aldean’s She's Country and Hicktown so I could hear Adam Shoenfeld jamming on the guitar. I found myself running, playing air guitar and smiling. I'm sure I looked CRAZY...but I didn't care. Anything to get me through another mile.

Blessings,

Stephanie

If you missed my first 16 miles of the Chicago Marathon, you can check out my stories here:

Miles #1- #4

Miles #5- #8

Miles #9- #13

Miles #14- #15

Mile #16

P.S. To make sure you never miss a post, enter your email address on the right and hit SUBSCRIBE. Thank you!marathon3

I'll get right to the point on this one. As I was preparing my marathon mile list, I knew my inspiration for completing Mile #16 would be my husband, Mike.

For 18 years Mike has served in various capacities with the Indiana State Police. From the moment I said I do, I have been his #1 supporter. I’ve been a proud police wife, and he's always had my respect. But his career never "inspired" me; not until he transferred to a task force. On this task force, he has spent countless of hours hunting down child predators.

In my opinion, child predators are the sickest of the sick. The media is starting to shine a light on how dark and disgusting the world of children pornography and sexual exploitation is and the strategies pedophiles use to prey on children.

My husband, even though I pray this isn't how he spends the rest of his career, works countless hours, day and night thinking through each case to ensure no stone is unturned. Unlike most jobs, he can’t leave his work at the office. It’s in his head and will not depart until the day he dies.

I know that sounds dramatic, but I want you to understand the gravity of what our police officer deal with and observe on a daily basis. What they see changes them. Mike’s drive to put predators behind bars for a very long time and his work ethic inspires me. During marathon mile #16, I prayed for his safety and child pornography and abuse victims. The world of child exploitation is a dark, sad world and it takes dedicated women and men, like my husband, to keep children safe.

For 15 years he has been beside me through good times and the bad. He continually pushes me and well, tells it like it is. If you want to hear the truth...ask my husband.

Honestly, he didn't think I would run the marathon. I quit my training not once, but two times, heck maybe three times! I had medical issues arise, which concerned him so much he thought I should quit. He said, "I want you here a while longer."

But at no time did he prevent me from pursuing my dream, and even though he didn’t agree, he continued to support me. He'd give his opinion, but when I was out on a run, and it started lightning, he was in his truck, looking to pick me up. When I needed water, he brought me water. And when I needed to sleep all afternoon after a long run, he let me rest.

My husband is my number one supporter, and he's always on the sideline as my biggest fan. He and the children he fights for every day got me through marathon mile #16.

Your giving challenge for today is to pray.
*Pray for police officers who work child exploitation cases.
*Pray for child victims and survivors.
*Pray for the children that are being abused.
*Pray for children to come forward and tell someone.
*Pray for the people in these child’s life to recognize something is not right.
*Pray for the child that had the courage to come forward.
*And pray for physical and mental healing for their body and mind. that brings them comfort and peace.

Blessings,

Stephanie

If you missed my first 15 miles, you can check out my stories here:

Miles #1- #4

Miles #5- #8

Miles #9- #13

Miles #14- #15

P.S. To make sure you never miss a post, enter your email address on the right and hit SUBSCRIBE. Thank you!