What’s Your Everest?

Chicago Marathon- Mile #18

Sitting on the edge of the tub wincing and talking to myself, turning around from shaving my husband says, "Pull it off quickly."

Yank! Ouch! Jetting up and hopping around I'd done it. I pulled off my toenail and now was in excruciating pain. Sitting back down, I said, "I'm feeling woozy. I may pass out."

I was a little dramatic. But my toe did hurt.

It's been two months since I ran the Chicago Marathon and I'm still feeling the effects. I've lost two toenails in two nights. I'm processing the experience and trying to hold on to my greatest accomplishment of the year, my Everest.

What's that quote by Helen Keller?

"Character cannot be developed in ease and quiet. Only through experience of trial and suffering can the soul be strengthened, ambition inspired, and success achieved."

The quote by Ms. Keller sums ups my training and the marathon. It was not easy and definitely not quiet. Ask my husband. I whined, cried and complained. Every training run came with a trial, from being chased by dogs to jumping in ditches because of distracted drivers. The first couple of months I suffered with every step. I was out of shape and nagging back problems wore on me more mentally than physically.

After crossing the finish line, I knew I had been strengthened, inspired, and success achieved.

Like mile 17, I was still running through a wall. I drew my inspiration for mile 18 from Brian Dickerson, Everest Solo Summiteer, Former USN Air Rescue Swimmer and Author of one of my favorite books, Blind Descent.

Brian and I work at Cisco and I had an opportunity to hear him speak at a company event. After the event, I logged into Amazon and bought his book, Blind Descent. I've been obsessed with Everest for years. A love passed down from my father. I've watched all the movies and read many books on the world's highest peak. If there is an IMAX on Everest I'm there!

My review on GoodReads summed up my feeling for Blind Descent and why Brian was my inspiration for mile 18.

" There are several things in life I’m obsessed with in reading about, Navy Seals and Mt. Everest. I think the draw for me is the understanding of those that are not just physically tough, but extraordinarily mental tough and Brian Dickinson definitely falls into this category. I started the book on a Saturday morning and couldn’t put it down. I’m a slow reader, so I literally did not accomplish anything all weekend except finishing the book. He had my attention in the prologue and never lost it. I might add he had me in tears on page two of the prologue also. This book was written with so much emotion I felt like I was on the journey with him and his family and friends. I’m not sure how one doesn’t believe in God after reading this book. I have ready many books on Everest, the tragedies and stories of survival and this by far is the best I’ve read. Even if you are not into Everest it would still be an excellent read. Anyone going through a struggle or a hurdle they think is impossible needs to read this book. There is always hope."

As I struggled with each step I would think about Brian's journey on Everest. I would think, it's sunny and warm while I'm running. Brian faced subzero temperatures. I had plenty of oxygen and Brian ran out. I was surrounded by thousands of people, cheering and supporting me each step of the marathon. Brian was alone. I could see the path in front of me, read the signs fans created and knew if there was a pothole that needed to be avoided. Brian experienced snow blindness and couldn't see his hand in front of his face.

If Brian could make it off Mt. Everest blind, I was going to make it through mile 18 and I did. No excuses. I suffered through mile 18, but character was developed. I was nearing the peak of my Everest. I ripped off the label with Brian's name etched, gave it a kiss, whispered a thank you and flung it over my shoulder. I was onto #19.

As we approach the New Year, I challenge you to think about what you want to accomplish in 2016? What's your Everest? Here are a couple of steps you can take that will put you on the path to success.

  1. Go read Blind Descent. It will motivate you to Dream Big and pursue those dreams.
  2. Grab a pen and paper, find a cozy, quiet place in your home, and jot down your goals for 2016.
  3. Pick one goal to focus on and write the next three steps you have to take to move towards accomplishing your goal.
  4. Shoot me an email at Stephanie@GivingGal.com or post on my FB wall one thing I can do to help you accomplish your goal. Accountability is key to success!

I'll wrap up with my favorite line from Blind Descent,

"Whatever your mountain is-no matter how impossible it seems at times, no matter how many obstacles you face along the way, and no matter how many people tell you it can't be done- it is possible for you to summit. My parting words are simple: Live life. Create goals, and then chase after them."

Blessings,

Stephanie

If you missed my first 17 miles, you can check out my stories here:

Miles #1- #4

Miles #5- #8

Miles #9- #13

Miles #14- #15

Mile #16

Mile #17

 

P.S. Never miss a post, enter your email address on the right and hit SUBSCRIBE. Thank you!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *